Stoop with Steps
Stoop with Steps

The covered area to the right of the door is where the new work will go.

Your new art will live here!
Your new art will live here!

This is a clearer shot of where the work will live.

57” from corner to corner.

Ginkgo Tryptic Inspiration
Ginkgo Tryptic Inspiration

This was the tryptic displayed at the American Craft Council show in St. Paul in April that started the conversation about a custom piece for your entry way. I used this as a basis for the sketches that follow.

NOTE: This sample has some actual leaves moving across the tryptic; I would not recommend that treatment for an outdoor installation.

Sketch One
Sketch One

This sketch show fern fronds at the top, ginkgo biloba leaves in the mid section, and viburnum or oak leaves on the bottom area. The horizontal “spacers” would be either a darkened patina or a hammered copper band that would wrap over the patina’d base in selective areas. Depending on the coloration of the leaf patina, the small and mid-sized squares would be used to add contrast and visual interest.

As always, if you would like to see specific leaves, I am happy to accommodate if available.

Porch with Sketch 1 to scale
Porch with Sketch 1 to scale

Based on a measurement of 57” between the door and the half wall, this is a proportional comp with sketch #1 superimposed on the wall.

Tryptic composite, option 1
Tryptic composite, option 1

This is a composite photo of your tryptic with the overlay pieces in position.

Totem Tryptic option 1, scale
Totem Tryptic option 1, scale

This is a proportional comp with your first option of the totem tryptic.

I have reworked the middle panel so that it has more recognizable leaves, and more contrast.

Note that the “overlay” items are in position, and the lighting for the porch will be different that the lighting where this photo was taken.

Tryptic in sunlight
Tryptic in sunlight

This photo was shot in dappled sunlight. This hopefully will give you an accurate sense of color in daylight. I would still like to bring out more detail on the [new] Tulip poplar section.

Tryptic Option 1, overlay panels in position
Tryptic Option 1, overlay panels in position

This is an overhead shot of the tryptic on a table with the textured and patina’d squares in position on the face of the tryptic. The bottom part of the photo is a little overexposed because of the bright sun today.

Tryptic composite, option 2
Tryptic composite, option 2

This is a shot of the fern-ginkgo-grapevine-milkweed tryptic. The lighting on this shot is a bit contrast-y because of the harsh sun. I’ve adjusted the exposure to compensate, but nothing is quite like an in-person review!

I need to live with it a while to decide where some overlaid pieces might help the layout. The colors are markedly cooler on this one.

An interesting thing about this composition, I think you could consider having the center piece rotated 180 degrees, as shown here.

Totem Tryptic option 2, scale
Totem Tryptic option 2, scale

This is the second option show to scale on your porch.

I think having a few overlay panels to help warm it up will help.

Option 2, side view
Option 2, side view

This is a shot leaning on the fence. The lighting isn’t ideal here.

Option 2 B
Option 2 B

In this layout, the center panel is rotated 180 degrees. I think it gives it some added visual interest and motion.

Totem Tryptic option 2B, scale
Totem Tryptic option 2B, scale

This shows the center panel rotated 180 degrees.

This is a display option you’d have with this piece, where you could change the orientation of one panel to change the layout; something to consider.

I think rotating the center brings some warm colors toward the bottom, and keeps your eye moving through the tryptic.

Divider alternate
Divider alternate

This is an alternate to the black band separating the patina’d panels. I can do a textured band with some slight flame painting to add some warmth and textural depth.

Option 3 with overlays
Option 3 with overlays

This is a comp showing wrapped copper straps as dividers to the patina’d sections, with flame painted and lightly patina’d sections woven in and over the straps and panel edges.

This is a slightly different treatment. Let me know if this appeals to you.

Option 3 on the porch
Option 3 on the porch

This comp in place; with overlays and copper banding instead of the darker dividers as an option to consider.

Detail, Milkweed
Detail, Milkweed

As with all shots in the sun, when the copper bounces light back into the camera, it’s sometimes hard to see the detail. This is one of the Milkweed sections up close so you can appreciate the detail.

Ready to begin
Ready to begin

The boards are prepped and I am ready to start composing. I found some delicate ferns for the top section and will work to bring out some reds using an apple cider vinegar and muriatic acid blend for the patina.

Watch the in progress video

Sketch Three
Sketch Three

This sketch show a serrated leaf at the top, possibly silver maple or japanese maple, red bud leaves as halves along the seams [to visually tie the totems together as a set]. Smaller leaves or ferns would be used to draw the eye upwards; a repeating pattern of Ginkgo leaves would ground the base. I would like to use Banana leaf or Calla to add some depth and texture to the background behind the redbud.

A circular cascade moves across the three totems. Again, the horizontal “spacers” could be simply a darkened patina, wrapped copper wire or a hammered copper band over the patina’d base to establish a rhythm.

Small squares of hammered copper may be added after the leaf patina renders as needed for contrast and visual interest.

Sketch Two
Sketch Two

This sketch show Ginkgo Biloba at the top, fern fronds in the upper-mid section, viburnum leaves surrounding a surface tension circular patterning [typically the bare copper is predominant in the center of the circles]. Tulip Poplar or some other hardwood leaves float up from the ground toward the center.

As in sketch one, the horizontal “spacers” would be either a darkened patina, planished wire or a hammered copper band wrapping over the patina’d base in selective areas.

Stoop with Steps
Your new art will live here!
Ginkgo Tryptic Inspiration
Sketch One
Porch with Sketch 1 to scale
Tryptic composite, option 1
Totem Tryptic option 1, scale
Tryptic in sunlight
Tryptic Option 1, overlay panels in position
Tryptic composite, option 2
Totem Tryptic option 2, scale
Option 2, side view
Option 2 B
Totem Tryptic option 2B, scale
Divider alternate
Option 3 with overlays
Option 3 on the porch
Detail, Milkweed
Ready to begin
Sketch Three
Sketch Two
Stoop with Steps

The covered area to the right of the door is where the new work will go.

Your new art will live here!

This is a clearer shot of where the work will live.

57” from corner to corner.

Ginkgo Tryptic Inspiration

This was the tryptic displayed at the American Craft Council show in St. Paul in April that started the conversation about a custom piece for your entry way. I used this as a basis for the sketches that follow.

NOTE: This sample has some actual leaves moving across the tryptic; I would not recommend that treatment for an outdoor installation.

Sketch One

This sketch show fern fronds at the top, ginkgo biloba leaves in the mid section, and viburnum or oak leaves on the bottom area. The horizontal “spacers” would be either a darkened patina or a hammered copper band that would wrap over the patina’d base in selective areas. Depending on the coloration of the leaf patina, the small and mid-sized squares would be used to add contrast and visual interest.

As always, if you would like to see specific leaves, I am happy to accommodate if available.

Porch with Sketch 1 to scale

Based on a measurement of 57” between the door and the half wall, this is a proportional comp with sketch #1 superimposed on the wall.

Tryptic composite, option 1

This is a composite photo of your tryptic with the overlay pieces in position.

Totem Tryptic option 1, scale

This is a proportional comp with your first option of the totem tryptic.

I have reworked the middle panel so that it has more recognizable leaves, and more contrast.

Note that the “overlay” items are in position, and the lighting for the porch will be different that the lighting where this photo was taken.

Tryptic in sunlight

This photo was shot in dappled sunlight. This hopefully will give you an accurate sense of color in daylight. I would still like to bring out more detail on the [new] Tulip poplar section.

Tryptic Option 1, overlay panels in position

This is an overhead shot of the tryptic on a table with the textured and patina’d squares in position on the face of the tryptic. The bottom part of the photo is a little overexposed because of the bright sun today.

Tryptic composite, option 2

This is a shot of the fern-ginkgo-grapevine-milkweed tryptic. The lighting on this shot is a bit contrast-y because of the harsh sun. I’ve adjusted the exposure to compensate, but nothing is quite like an in-person review!

I need to live with it a while to decide where some overlaid pieces might help the layout. The colors are markedly cooler on this one.

An interesting thing about this composition, I think you could consider having the center piece rotated 180 degrees, as shown here.

Totem Tryptic option 2, scale

This is the second option show to scale on your porch.

I think having a few overlay panels to help warm it up will help.

Option 2, side view

This is a shot leaning on the fence. The lighting isn’t ideal here.

Option 2 B

In this layout, the center panel is rotated 180 degrees. I think it gives it some added visual interest and motion.

Totem Tryptic option 2B, scale

This shows the center panel rotated 180 degrees.

This is a display option you’d have with this piece, where you could change the orientation of one panel to change the layout; something to consider.

I think rotating the center brings some warm colors toward the bottom, and keeps your eye moving through the tryptic.

Divider alternate

This is an alternate to the black band separating the patina’d panels. I can do a textured band with some slight flame painting to add some warmth and textural depth.

Option 3 with overlays

This is a comp showing wrapped copper straps as dividers to the patina’d sections, with flame painted and lightly patina’d sections woven in and over the straps and panel edges.

This is a slightly different treatment. Let me know if this appeals to you.

Option 3 on the porch

This comp in place; with overlays and copper banding instead of the darker dividers as an option to consider.

Detail, Milkweed

As with all shots in the sun, when the copper bounces light back into the camera, it’s sometimes hard to see the detail. This is one of the Milkweed sections up close so you can appreciate the detail.

Ready to begin

The boards are prepped and I am ready to start composing. I found some delicate ferns for the top section and will work to bring out some reds using an apple cider vinegar and muriatic acid blend for the patina.

Watch the in progress video

Sketch Three

This sketch show a serrated leaf at the top, possibly silver maple or japanese maple, red bud leaves as halves along the seams [to visually tie the totems together as a set]. Smaller leaves or ferns would be used to draw the eye upwards; a repeating pattern of Ginkgo leaves would ground the base. I would like to use Banana leaf or Calla to add some depth and texture to the background behind the redbud.

A circular cascade moves across the three totems. Again, the horizontal “spacers” could be simply a darkened patina, wrapped copper wire or a hammered copper band over the patina’d base to establish a rhythm.

Small squares of hammered copper may be added after the leaf patina renders as needed for contrast and visual interest.

Sketch Two

This sketch show Ginkgo Biloba at the top, fern fronds in the upper-mid section, viburnum leaves surrounding a surface tension circular patterning [typically the bare copper is predominant in the center of the circles]. Tulip Poplar or some other hardwood leaves float up from the ground toward the center.

As in sketch one, the horizontal “spacers” would be either a darkened patina, planished wire or a hammered copper band wrapping over the patina’d base in selective areas.

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